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I got a new car recently. By recently I mean a year ago. I like cars, but I’m not a ‘car person’. I do my research ahead of time, but then I pretty much make my final decision based largely on how it just feels to be sitting in that driver seat taking things for a spin.

I like to think about car reviews when I think about how the tech I’ve often reviewed – phones, TVs, laptops – can get too caught up in year-over-year changes. Those of us living in the thick of the new things can get caught up in the tiny differences. But most people are upgrading a model they’ve owned for many years. My old car was over ten years old! For these buyers, almost every new model – including the inexpensive ones – will blow their minds.

When I bought my car (a Honda Civic), I didn’t pay any mind to features like cruise control. Any time I’ve driven a car with cruise control I’ve only ever tested it for the sake of checking what it feels like.

And I think it feels terrible.

I’m all for self-driving cars, and look forward to just having driverless cars on demand in our future. When cars truly drive themselves why should we even own them? But cruise control is the awkward teenager of vehicle automation. It takes the joy out of driving while putting you into a terrible realm where the car is speeding along without your feet being involved at all. Scary stuff.

Anyway, yes, my Civic has cruise control. But amongst the same set of controls, I discovered it also has a Limiter. And I adore it.

I use the limiter every single day, every time I’m in the car, and I tweak and twiddle the setting constantly. It’s brilliant.

So what’s a limiter? Like cruise control, you set a speed you want to ‘cruise’ at, except now it’s a speed you simply don’t want to accelerate past. With this setting in place, you are still doing all of the driving. It just stops the throttle from letting you push past the magic number.

Maybe that doesn’t sound too different, but it really is. Because while you would never use cruise control in a 50 or 60 zone, the limiter is perfect for these environments just as it is at home on the freeway at 110.

The limiter has helped me to do the single most important thing while driving. To keep my eyes on the road, surrounding vehicles, and overall conditions around me.

Having to constantly glance down and check speed to maintain a speed limit without speeding is a constant dance of the eyes. It’s fine, it’s doable. But now the limiter worries about that for me. I can just drive the way drivers should.

The limiter doesn’t brake for you, it only controls the accelerator, which means it can slide past the limit you’ve set if you are going down a hill. But if you do go three clicks above the limit you set you’ll get an audible alert to let you know it’s happening so you can react accordingly. And if you plant your foot hard to the floor it will also override the limit.

I feel like the limiter makes me a more active driver. My eyes are where they should be, and when I change speed zones I quickly tap and adjust the limit to reflect the change. Once set I can tap up and down to tweak the exact limit I’ve set, or cancel and reengage to whatever speed I’m driving at.

And, seriously, it makes me feel like an F1 driver leaving pit lane when I have my foot down cruising at 60 and get to cancel the limit as I enter a freeway on-ramp and feel the car just take off at the push of a button.

It also keeps my drive at a more constant, smooth speed than ever before, across all speed zones. I live outside the city, so I’m rarely stuck in traffic like some people. But I’m also in a regional town, so it’s not pure cruising. Over the last few thousand miles my fuel economy sits at around 6.3L/100km (a little ahead of the Honda claim of 6.4L).

I think no car should have cruise control. And I think every car should have a limiter. It’s active, it helps keep our eyes where they should be, and it helps maintain a smoother drive. I love it.

Check your car settings. Maybe you already have one too?

Starting August 10, incredible Augmented Reality (AR) experiences will be offered in six major cities around the world in a collaboration between Apple and New York’s New Museum.

The AR[T] project sees special experiences available as a walking tour from Apple Store locations in San Francisco, New York, London, Paris, Hong Kong and Tokyo, featuring artists Nick Cave, Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg, Cao Fei, John Giorno, Carsten Höller and Pipilotti Rist.

A giant AR figure stands on a city building
Nick Cave reimagines his iconic “Soundsuits”
AR words float in the sky over a city park
John Giorno’s “Now at the Dawn of My Life”
An AR installation in a park
Cao Fei’s “Trade Eden”

According to Apple:

The three new sessions include an interactive walk featuring works by some of the world’s premier contemporary artists, an in-store session that teaches the basics of creating AR using Swift Playgrounds and an AR art installation viewable in every Apple Store worldwide.

While these installations are in select locations around the world, every store can experience a work called “Amass” by American artist Nick Cave.

A Nick Cave AR art experience inside an Apple Store
“Amass” by Nick Cave, available in every Apple Store worldwide

iOS 13 has some particularly exciting new AR tools coming to iPhone and iPad, which will make creating experiences more accessible than ever. So the timing feels particularly exciting to encourage people to see what’s possible and explore ideas of their own.

I first covered Gogoro nearly four years ago for CNET while in Taiwan for Computex. The Taiwanese electric scooter company was designing beautiful scooters but had also devised a battery swap platform around the city to make charging a non-issue.

At the time the company was open about trying to make its battery service something that other companies could interoperate with. In countries where scooters are everywhere but no one has a garage to do their own recharging, it was a great idea and if it operated independently across different makes and models it would be a great service for all.

Now Techcrunch reports that Gogoro has new partners on board. Yamaha, Aeon Motors and PGO are all about to launch new scooters to work with Gogoro hardware.

I’ve always hoped the company would succeed. Such a great concept and it would be a shame for others to fight to control end-to-end instead of join forces and make EV more viable for the scooter industry across South-East Asia.

Glad to see it’s happening.

USB-C hubs are finally starting to pick up some steam, and as the range of options grows we’re seeing some well thought out (but not overcooked) versions hit the market.

I’ve loved TwelveSouth accessories for many years. From the classic BookBook cases that made your iPhone or MacBook look like an old leather-bound volume; to the gorgeous Compass iPad stands; to the rest of their stands and accessories for Macs, iPads and iPhones. Yes, they’re all about Apple stuff.

The company’s StayGo USB-C hub features all the key ports you want. 3x USB-A 3.0 ports (one does fast charging); 1x HDMI port; 1x SD + 1x micro-SD slot (not a shared slot); Gigabit Ethernet; power input and power passthrough. All in a subtle dark grey package.

The extra details relate to the way it is setup to give you the cables you need for core usage both at your desk and when you’re on the road. Thus the StayGo. Get it now?

There’s a storage slot for a 6-inch USB-C cable so you’ve always got that main connector cable with you when you need to grab and get gone already. The hub itself is metal and TwelveSouth says the design for this cable should keep the cable (and the hub) nice and protected in your bag.

Here’s the video if you want to see the TwelveSouth pitch.

In Australia the StayGo sells for around $179.99.

Alexa not doing it for you? Now you can ask Google to help you out via your Sonos speakers instead. The new features landed in an update on Tuesday night.

Alexa has been available since last year for Sonos One and Sonos Beam speakers. And while you can’t have both at the same time on the same single speaker, if you have more than one of either, or both, or whatever combo, you can have both Alexa and Google Assistant in different parts of the house and they can work together relatively seamlessly.